Asterix in Spain (1969)

Astérix en Hispanie

A&O's trustee is a Spain in the neck


Presenting a pretentious thematic undercurrent…

Once more this 'Asterix In…' book is far more about modern Spain than its ancient equivalent, though the issue of Spain's fascist government, at the time of the book's composition, is overlooked. An opportunity - perhaps understandably - missed.

Also a study of "innocence". Pepe's complete innocence and unpretentiousness is both effective as a tool against the Romans (he bites them) and reflective of the Village's own attitude. (Kessler)

Notable Nomenclature…

Continuity; lack-thereof and other gaffes…

Cleverness and contemporaneity…

Cacofonix creates…

Obelix has a tender side...

Non-PC World

The foreign caricatures of this book - unlike those of Asterix in Britain - are almost entirely complimentary, though the inevitable stereotypes - bullfighting, tourism and Romany dancing - are all present and correct.

Classic Pegleg…

Doesn't get the opportunity to wax classical; this due to:

Redbeard's proactive retort…

"And the first one to make any funny remarks will be bait."

Good or What?

Not too good.

The character of Pepe is a major annoyance to the readers as well as the gauls - which tends to scupper what is otherwise a genial 'Asterix in …' story. Whilst the Gaulish villagers are hilariously portrayed, once A&O actually set off for Spain the book starts to rely on the obvious Spanish stereotypes - flamenco-dancing-gypsies, bullfights and people saying 'Ole' - rather than being genuinely perceptive. There is a lot of fabulous wordplay in passing, though.